Ditch the Paraffin Candles and Opt for Nature’s Air Purifier

updated: December 14, 2018

Beeswax candles are some of the oldest candles in history. Besides being all-natural, they possess several health benefits. They are reported to improve allergy and asthma symptoms. Like air purifiers, beeswax candles release negative ions that neutralize the particles from air pollutants, rendering them harmless.

They’re far superior in terms of health compared to paraffin candles. People who are sensitive to fragrances often prefer light-scented beeswax to overly perfumed paraffin candles. The problem with paraffin wax lies in its origin. It’s a by-product of petroleum refining and is actually made from the sludge at the bottom of crude oil barrels.

As a result of the subsequent bleaching treatment from benzene or toluene, paraffin wax is filled with seven documented toxins, including two known carcinogens. On top of that, chemical colorings and fragrances are added to make them more appealing. Our eyes and noses may be fooled, but our bodies pay for all the toxins we breathe in when we burn those candles.

Other beeswax benefits

Beeswax candles are 100% bee-made, therefore 100% natural. This makes it a renewable resource too, unlike the petroleum products used to make paraffin candles. They also smell natural, since beeswax picks up the honey and nectar scents found in honeycomb. While burning, they emit the same light spectrum as the sun, which gives a more comforting ambiance than paraffin candles.

Beeswax Candles
Beeswax Candles

Beeswax has a high melting point (highest of any wax), meaning that your candles will last a lot longer than paraffin. They don’t drip as much either, which leaves less mess. Burning paraffin candles also produces black soot that can stain walls and other interior surfaces. Not so with beeswax. We here at Cleanup Expert can really appreciate that!

What’s the deal with negative ions?

As we mentioned earlier, beeswax emits negative ions much like some electric air purifiers do. Negative ions actually clear air of mold spores, pollen, dander, odors, germs, dust and other nasty particles. Most of these are high in positively charged particles, and in the atomic world, opposites attract.

When the negative ions grab hold of the nasty particles, they become too heavy to remain airborne. So they drop to the floor other other surfaces where, you guessed it, we can clean them right up with a good vacuum or dust cloth.

Several other benefits of negative ions have been noted over the years from various studies. Here are a few:

  • Increases sense of well-being and mental clarity. Often called a natural anti-depressant, especially for those with Seasonal Affective Disorder.
  • Improves breathing rate, decreases blood pressure and relieves tension. There’s some evidence that they may combat free radicals in your body too.
  • Helps you sleep better by normalizing serotonin in the brain.
  • Reduces headaches and other sickness. One study found that installing negative ion air cleaners in a high-tech work environment reduced employee reports of headaches and illness by 78%.

The drawbacks to beeswax

Honestly, there aren’t many, but one of the reasons paraffin candles are so popular is because they can be mass-produced and as a result are very cheap. Beeswax is about 10 times the cost of paraffin because it’s a lot more rare.

For every 100 pounds of honey harvested, only 1-2 pounds of beeswax can be collected. But again, they last a lot longer than paraffin, so in the long run it could very well even out unless you burn a ton of candles.

Beware when shopping and read the labels, because sometimes “beeswax” candles can be misleading. Some may only contain as little as 5% of beeswax. Be sure to look for labels that show 100% pure beeswax.

Also, make sure the candles you buy don’t have a metal wire in the wick. These could contain lead, which would ruin the beneficial air purifier properties of the beeswax.

Our suggestion: Find yourself some all-natural beeswax candles, light ’em up and relax with a good cup of tea at the end of the day.

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